Collaborators

Collaborators

The Pollinator Library is an accumulation of data generously submitted by scientists studying plant-pollinator networks. Below is a summary of research that has contributed to our database. Please contact us if you are interested in contributing plant-insect observation data to the Pollinator Library. We would like to hear from you.

Alabama
Dr. Boyd, Dr. Robert Boyd, Robert Boyd Robert Boyd, Professor, Auburn University - Dr. Boyd received his PhD in Botany from the University of California at Davis. His research focuses on the ecology of metal hyperaccumulation by plants, as well as the natural history & management of rare southeastern plant species. Dr. Boyd currently serves as the Undergraduate Program Officer for the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University.
Arizona
Dr. Mary Price, Dr. Price, Mary Price Mary Price, Adjunct Professor, University of Arizona - Dr. Price received her PhD from the University of Arizona. She has carried out long term research at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory on how plant-pollinator interactions mold the evolution of flower morphology, plant mating patterns, and plant population dynamics. Other research focuses on how ecologically similar desert rodents coexist, and the nature of their interactions with one another and with the plants whose seeds they eat.  Despite holding Emerita status with University of California- Riverside, she reamins active in teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students, including those at the University of Arizona.
Colorado
Mark Vandever Mark Vandever, Rangeland Management Specialist, U.S. Geological Survey - Mark is currently involved in two research projects related to pollinators. One of those projects is evaluating the effects of USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) pollinator plantings on native bee diversity, richness, and habitat in agricultural and rangeland landscapes. Mark is also part of a project assessing the ecosystem services CRP fields provide by documenting the occurrence, accumulation and potential effects of pesticides on native bee populations.
Iowa
Steve Hendrix, Dr. Hendrix, Stephen Hendrix Steve Hendrix, Professor Emeritus, University of Iowa - Dr. Hendrix received his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley. Research in his lab focuses on plant-animal interactions from the perspective of conservation biology & evolutionary ecology. One area of interest is solitary bee pollination in fragmented prairie landscapes. The main goals of this project are to assess local vs landscape effects on diversity, habitat preference & if habitat rehabilitation is possible. In collaboration with groups from California & Germany, Dr. Hendrix also explores the role of wild bee pollination in large agricultural crops such as almonds. 
Michigan
Dr. Schemske, Doug Schemske, Douglas Schemske Douglas Schemske, Hannah Professor of Biology, Michigan State University - Dr. Schemske received his PhD from the University of Illinois, was a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and has held academic positions at Amherst College, The University of Chicago, and University of Washington.  He currently holds appointments at Kellogg Biological Station and the Departments of Plant Biology and Horticulture at MSU. His research investigates the ecological and genetic mechanisms of adaptation and speciation in plants from temperate and tropical environments. 
Missouri
Retha Edens-Meier, Dr. Edens-Meier Retha Edens-Meier, Professor, Saint Louis University - Dr. Edens-Meier received her PhD in Biology from Saint Louis University. Along with teaching in the School of Education, she is a research associate at Kings Park & Botanical Garden (honorary) and the Missouri Botanical Garden. Her current research project is based around the breeding systems & pollination ecology of Viola pedata. 
North Dakota
Photo of Russ Bryant Russ Bryant, MS Candidate, Humboldt State University - Russ is researching bee community structure and habitat suitability within native prairie and restored prairie landscapes of Eastern North Dakota.
Clint Otto Clint Otto, Research Ecologist, USGS, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center - Clint studies the effects of land-use change on ecosystem services and wildlife habitat. One of Clint's focal research areas involves improving forage conditions for honey bees residing on USDA conservation lands in the Prairie Pothole Region.
Ohio
Dr. Macior, Walt Macior, Walter Macior L. Walter Macior, Professor Emeritus, University of Akron - Dr. Macior (1926-2007) was a well published scientist and inspiring teacher who specialized in studying the functional diversity of Pedicularis & it’s bumblebee pollinators.
Texas
Photo of Angie Fishing Angela Begosh, PhD Candidate, Oklahoma State University (Integrative Biology) - Angie is investigating how different land use types, such as CRP, agriculture, and rangeland affect native pollinator diversity in the Southern High Plains of Texas. An additional component of her work involves determining the importance of wetland plant species in pollinator diets.
Vermont
Bernd Heinrich, Dr. Heinrich, Bumblebee Economics Bernd Heinrich, Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont - Dr. Heinrich received his PhD from UCLA after completing research on moth physiology. His work ranges from physiological mechanisms of body temperature regulation in bumblebees to behavioral studies on corvids, with much in between. Dr. Heinrich has published numerous scientific articles, popular stories, written book chapters and managed to author multiple books, like Bumblebee Economics.