USGS - science for a changing world

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

  Home About NPWRC Our Science Staff Employment Contacts Common Questions About the Site

Distribution of Fishes in the Red River of the North Basin on Multivariate Environmental Gradients

GIF -- Map of Red River Basin

by

Todd Marvin Koel
Zoology Department, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota

May 1997


Abstract:  Koel, Todd Marvin, Ph.D., Department of Zoology, College of Science and Mathematics, North Dakota State University, May 1997. Distribution of Fishes in the Red River of the North Basin on Multivariate Environmental Gradients. Major Professor: Dr. John J. Peterka.

Surveys of fishes conducted at 1026 sites from 1892-1994 identified 77 native and seven introduced species in the Red River of the North basin in the United States. Twenty-nine species were cyprinids; and 10, 9, 8, and 6 species were percids, centrarchids, catostomids, and ictalurids, respectively. The white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), and common shiner (Luxilus cornutus) were the most common species, occurring at 60%, 53%, and 47% of the sites sampled, respectively. Species which were most rare included the largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis), pugnose shiner (Notropis anogenus), and mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), all found at <1% of the sites. Cluster analysis (CA) based on species present placed 26 streams into four ecologically meaningful clusters, suggesting that size and geographic location of streams influenced faunal composition. Species assemblages of streams were produced by CA which described typical associations of fishes found in different regions of the basin. The coefficient of determination for fish species richness correlated with average annual discharge, stream length, and watershed area of 60%, 57%, and 50%, respectively. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that average annual discharge, the coefficient of variation of mean monthly discharge, specific conductivity, hardness, and residue were the most important physiochemical variables controlling fish assemblage composition at 46 stream reaches in the basin. Reaches with high species diversity were characterized by waters with high discharge and low flow variability, specific conductivity, hardness, and residue.


This resource is based on the following source:

Koel, Todd Marvin.  1997.  Distribution of fishes in the Red River of the North Basin on Multivariate environmental gradients.  Ph.D. thesis, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota.  275 pp.

This resource should be cited as:

Koel, Todd Marvin.  1997.  Distribution of fishes in the Red River of the North Basin on Multivariate environmental gradients.  Ph.D. thesis, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota.  Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Online.  http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/fish/norbasin/index.htm (Version 03JUN98).


See Distribution and Dispersal of Fishes in the Red River Basin for further information on fish species of the Red River Basin.

Table of Contents

Tables


Downloading Instructions -- Instructions on downloading and extracting files from this site.
(Download) norbasin.zip (1.2M) -- Distribution of Fishes in the Red River of the North Basin on Multivariate Environmental Gradients
Installation: Extract all files and open index.htm in a web browser.

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/fish/norbasin/index.htm
Page Contact Information: Webmaster
Page Last Modified: Saturday, 02-Feb-2013 04:36:42 EST
Menlo Park, CA [caww54]