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Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

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Inventory of Wintering Geese with a Multispectral Scanner

Figures


Figure 1: Line graph of reflective percentages of White-fronted, Cackling Canada, Lesser Snow, and Ross' Geese across wavelengths of 450-2450 nm.
Figure 1.  Mean bidirectional spectral reflectance for Ross', lesser snow, white-fronted, and cackling Canada geese.

 

Figure 2: Line graph showing patterned fields between lines from Fig. 1 illustrating significant differences in mean bidirectional spectral reflectance.
Figure 2.  Significant differences (P < 0.05) in mean bidirectional spectral reflectance among adult white geese (adult Ross' and adult lesser snow geese combined), white-fronted, and cackling Canada geese.

 

Figure 3: Line graph of reflective percentages of Bare soil, Green vegetation, Turbid water, White-fronted Geese, and Adult White Geese across wavelengths of 450-2450 nm with two regions of Atmospheric Water Absorption.
Figure 3.  Bidirectional spectral for adult white geese (adult Ross' and adult lesser snow geese combined), white-fronted geese, turbid water, bare soil, and green winter wheat.

 

Figure 4: Plotted line graph comparing manually counted versus mixed model predictions for numbers of geese. Y = 8.24 + 0.99X  (R2 = 0.97, SE + 99.5)
Figure 4.  Manual count of the number of geese in a flock from simultaneously acquired aerial photographs regressed against mixture model predictions of number of geese using local estimate of water reflectance.

 

Figure 5: Line graph showing midpoint between three graphed points of infared versus red reflectance for White-fronted Geese, White Adult Geese, and Water.
Figure 5.  Mixture model domain for scene composed of white geese, dark geese, and water. Mean and covariance (1 SD ellipse) for 3 objects of the mixture model. The proportions of a pixel covered by white geese, dark geese, and water could be estimated using geometry by drawing a line from each vertex through the observation to the opposite leg of the triangle. The fraction of the line between the intersection of the lines and the opposite leg defines the proportion of the object at the corresponding vertex.