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Selected Chapters From
"Ecology and Management of Breeding Waterfowl"

GIF -- Ducks

Bruce D.J. Batt, Alan D. Afton, Michael G. Anderson, C. Davison Ankney,
Douglas H. Johnson, John A. Kadlec, and Gary L. Krapu, editors

University of Minnesota Press
Minneapolis and London


This resource is based on selected chapters from the following source:
Batt, Bruce D. J., Alan D. Afton, Michael G. Anderson, C. David Ankney, Douglas
     H. Johnson, John A. Kadlec, and Gary L. Krapu, editors.  1992.  Ecology
     and management of breeding waterfowl.  University of Minnesota Press,
     Minneapolis, MN.  635pp.

Contents


Notes on Contributers

Robert J. Blohm received his B.S. in fisheries and wildlife from Michigan State University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in wildlife ecology from the University of Wisconsin. His graduate work, in association with the Delta Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Station, centered on the breeding ecology of the Gadwall in southern Manitoba. Since 1979, he has worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Migratory Bird Management, and has been involved extensively with waterfowl population survey and banding programs in North America. He is currently the Office's Chief, Branch of Operations.

Lewis M. Cowardin is a research bilogist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center. He received his undergraduate degree in biology from Harvard University, his master's degree in wildlife management from the University of Massachusetts, and his doctorate in wildlife management from Cornell University. He has conducted research on the ecology of wild turkeys and several species of ducks, as well as a number of habitat inventory and classification used in the National Inventory of Wetlands in the United States. His primary interests are in waterfowl and wetland ecology, population dynamics, and remote sensing of habitat. He is currently conducting research on systems that link remotely sensed data with population models.

Douglas H. Johnson has spent twenty years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, where he is currently chief of the Northern Plains Ecology Section. His research interests include population dynamics of animals, ecology of grassland birds, quantitative methods in ecology, and simulation modeling. Ongoing projects include a population model of the annual cycle of Mallards, breeding bird use of Conservation Reserve Program lands in the northern prairies, and estimation techniques for survival of clutches and broods. He has received a B.A. in mathematics and psychology from the University of Minnesota, an M.S. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin,and a Ph.D. in zoology from North Dakota State University. He holds adjunct or lecturer appoointments at North Dakota State University and Jamestown College.

Gary L. Krapu has been a research biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center since 1971. He received his doctorate degree in animal ecology from Iowa State University in 1972. The principal focus of his research has been on factors governing habitat selection and productivity in waterfowl and other migratory waterbirds that breed or stage in the midcontinent region of North America. Several of these investigations have concentrated on the role of nutrition reserves in the life histories of ducks, geese, and cranes. He currently is studying factors affecting survival rates of pre-fledged Mallard and Gadwalls in the prairie pothole region of North Dakota.

James D. Nichols earned a Ph.D. in wildlife ecology from Michigan State University. He is currently leader of the Population Estimation and Modeling Group of the Migratory Bird Research Branch, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in Laurel, Maryland. His research has focused on methods for estimating parameters for natural animal populations and on applications of such methods to understanding animal population dynamics, with emphasis on waterfowl populations.

Dennis G. Raveling (1939-1991) earned his graduate degrees in zoology from the University of Minnesota (M.S., 1963) and Southern Illinios Universtiy (Ph.D., 1967). He was a research scientists for the Canadian Wildlife Service before joining the faculty of the University of California at Davis in 1971 as professor of wildlife biology. His research centered on investigations of the life history, behavior, and population dynamics of waterfowl, including studies on arctic breeding areas. His work has been honored by election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, elective membershib of the American Ornithologists' Union, and receipt of a Special Recognition Service Award for leadership in wildlife education and research and a Wildlife Publication Award from The Wildlife Society.

Kenneth J. Reinecke is a research biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and currently is leader of the Vicksburg Field Station for the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. He earned a Ph.D. in wildlife ecology from the University of Maine in 1978, and has experience with research and manangement of waterfowl in Nebraska, North Dakota, and southern Canada. For the past 10 years he has been studying habitat requirements of Mallards and Wood Ducks wintering in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley.

Alan B. Sargeant received a B.S. in wildlife management from the University of Minnesota in 1959, and continued graduate work there until joining the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1962. From 1963-67 he was part of a University of Minnesota study team using newly developed radio telemetry methods to study predators, primarily red foxes, at the Cedar Creek Natural History Area in Bethel, Minnesota. Since 1967 he has been a wildlife research biologist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, where he has engaged in studies of mammalian predator ecology and behavior, predation on prairie ducks, predator distributions and abundance, and effectiveness of predator control methods.

Michael D. Schwartz received B.S. (1980) and M.S. (1981) degrees in zoology from North Dakota State University. His research emphasis has been on foraging patterns and distribution of migratory nongame birds in western North Dakota. Currently he is a biological techinician for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center.


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